new


#EndAcidSale Sign The Petition

A Letter To,
The Prime Minister of India, Minister for Home Affairs and the Chief Ministers of all States/Union Territories,

Subject: Make Acid Unavailable To The Common Man

We write with the hope that our request, echoing the pleas of several hundreds of acid attack victims shall be heard. India witnesses as many as 1000 cases of acid attacks every year (source: BBC). The number of acid attacks increased between 2012 to 2014 by an alarming 250%. It remains one of the most horrifying forms of gender based violence with almost 90% of victims being women.

In December 2012, the world was taken by storm as details were made public about the horrendous gangrape of an innocent 23-year old girl. A girl we named Nirbhaya in the hope that she would be the last victim of our apathy. Brave Nirbhaya fought her attackers, fought her injuries, fought the pain of having her intestines removed and fought death itself, but she lost her battle with death on 29 December 2012.

Just a few weeks after Nirbhaya died, another innocent girl – J Vinodhini from Karaikal in Tamil Nadu – lost her life on 12 February 2013. Like Nirbhaya, she too was just 23 years old, had completed her B. Tech and had just taken up a job. Like Nirbhaya, she too fought against excruciating pain, not from gangrape, but due to a brutal acid attack, which instantly blinded her and burnt her face, chest and hands. Like Nirbhaya, she too lost her battle against death.

The protests after Nirbhaya helped in the bringing about changes in laws to make acid attacks a separate category of offence punishable with 10 years and even death penalty. However, three years later, things have not changed much with respect to how easily dangerous acids can be obtained by anyone. To explain in layman terms, anyone can go and purchase toilet-cleaning acids without any questions asked, and for just Rs 100 or less for a litre.

While there are serious lapses in the implementation of Poisons Acts and Poison Rules, compensatory & medical facilities for the victims, the biggest threat is posed by the unregulated availability of acid in the market.

Even after the Union Government issued an advisory to all states to bring acids under the state Poisons Act and Poisons Rules, only a few states have done so. Moreover, even states that have brought acids under the coverage of the Poisons Act have had issues with implementation of the rules on the ground. That acid continue to be easily available is reflected in the alarming rise of over 250% in the number of acid attacks between 2012 and 2014.

Our request to the Honourable Prime Minister of India, Honourable Minister for Home Affairs and Honourable Chief Ministers of all states/UTs is to immediately take the following steps to help restrict the sale of acids to lay persons:

Toilet-cleaning acid must be banned completely and use of other chemical cleaning agents must be encouraged

All states must bring strong acids under Poisons Act and Poisons Rules

Manufacturing of acids must be strictly restricted, with licensing requirement for manufacturers. Excise duties on concentrated acids should be increased to make them very expensive and beyond the reach of common persons. (For e.g. excise duty on sulphuric acid is 12.5% as against 21 – 72% on cigarettes and 70% on gutkha)

SDM of every district to report on shops, educational institutions, industrial establishments etc. allowed to manufacture, store and deal in strong acids and the list to be made available to the Chief Minister of every state

The guidelines for safe storage, distribution and restricted sale of acids must be strictly implemented by all states, with legal provision to hold seller of acid liable to imprisonment and fine (as against only fine) if it is proved that the guidelines issued have not been followed

Unauthorised storage, sale of strong acids to be checked through random surprise checks by the revenue authorities of the state

The changes to the Indian Penal Code after Nirbhaya made acid attacks a non-bailable offence. Bail must be strongly discouraged in cases of acid attack and may be granted only in exceptionally rare cases.

Yours Sincerely,
A Concerned Citizen Of India

[signature]

313,718 signatures

Share this with your friends:

   

JOIN THE MOVEMENT
Follow us to get campaign updates.

logo_low_res

 

The kind of pain experienced as a result of an acid attack is unimaginable. Victims face traumatizing after-effects including, but not limited to, peeled skin, loss of eyesight and hearing, exposed bone and cartilage, fatal infections, loss of sensation, amputations, skin replacements and grafts and most of all, the pain of having to live their entire life with severe disfigurement of the face and limbs.

We must come together and end this injustice once and for all. Sign the petition to ban the sale of acid to common people who have no use for it. Acid does not belong in homes, schools and hospitals. There are various alternative and safer methods to clean your homes and it is time to let our Government know that we will no longer accept easy sale of acid.

Come, sign the petition to join our cause. It is more urgent than ever before for our Government to ban over-the-counter sale of acid.

A Letter To,
The Prime Minister of India, Minister for Home Affairs and the Chief Ministers of all States/Union Territories,

Subject: Make Acid Unavailable To The Common Man

We write with the hope that our request, echoing the pleas of several hundreds of acid attack victims shall be heard. India witnesses as many as 1000 cases of acid attacks every year (source: BBC). The number of acid attacks increased between 2012 to 2014 by an alarming 250%. It remains one of the most horrifying forms of gender based violence with almost 90% of victims being women.

In December 2012, the world was taken by storm as details were made public about the horrendous gangrape of an innocent 23-year old girl. A girl we named Nirbhaya in the hope that she would be the last victim of our apathy. Brave Nirbhaya fought her attackers, fought her injuries, fought the pain of having her intestines removed and fought death itself, but she lost her battle with death on 29 December 2012.

Just a few weeks after Nirbhaya died, another innocent girl – J Vinodhini from Karaikal in Tamil Nadu – lost her life on 12 February 2013. Like Nirbhaya, she too was just 23 years old, had completed her B. Tech and had just taken up a job. Like Nirbhaya, she too fought against excruciating pain, not from gangrape, but due to a brutal acid attack, which instantly blinded her and burnt her face, chest and hands. Like Nirbhaya, she too lost her battle against death.

The protests after Nirbhaya helped in the bringing about changes in laws to make acid attacks a separate category of offence punishable with 10 years and even death penalty. However, three years later, things have not changed much with respect to how easily dangerous acids can be obtained by anyone. To explain in layman terms, anyone can go and purchase toilet-cleaning acids without any questions asked, and for just Rs 100 or less for a litre.

While there are serious lapses in the implementation of Poisons Acts and Poison Rules, compensatory & medical facilities for the victims, the biggest threat is posed by the unregulated availability of acid in the market.

Even after the Union Government issued an advisory to all states to bring acids under the state Poisons Act and Poisons Rules, only a few states have done so. Moreover, even states that have brought acids under the coverage of the Poisons Act have had issues with implementation of the rules on the ground. That acid continue to be easily available is reflected in the alarming rise of over 250% in the number of acid attacks between 2012 and 2014.

Our request to the Honourable Prime Minister of India, Honourable Minister for Home Affairs and Honourable Chief Ministers of all states/UTs is to immediately take the following steps to help restrict the sale of acids to lay persons:

  • Toilet-cleaning acid must be banned completely and use of other chemical cleaning agents must be encouraged

  • All states must bring strong acids under Poisons Act and Poisons Rules

  • Manufacturing of acids must be strictly restricted, with licensing requirement for manufacturers. Excise duties on concentrated acids should be increased to make them very expensive and beyond the reach of common persons. (For e.g. excise duty on sulphuric acid is 12.5% as against 21 – 72% on cigarettes and 70% on gutkha)

  • SDM of every district to report on shops, educational institutions, industrial establishments etc. allowed to manufacture, store and deal in strong acids and the list to be made available to the Chief Minister of every state

  • The guidelines for safe storage, distribution and restricted sale of acids must be strictly implemented by all states, with legal provision to hold seller of acid liable to imprisonment and fine (as against only fine) if it is proved that the guidelines issued have not been followed

  • Unauthorised storage, sale of strong acids to be checked through random surprise checks by the revenue authorities of the state

  • The changes to the Indian Penal Code after Nirbhaya made acid attacks a non-bailable offence. Bail must be strongly discouraged in cases of acid attack and may be granted only in exceptionally rare cases.

Yours Sincerely,
A Concerned Citizen Of India

 

15 Comments

  1. This Acid-Attack Survivor Giving Beauty Tips Is The Best Kind Of Inspiration Ever
    September 1, 2015 @ 8:52 am

    […] You can sign the petition here.  […]

  2. Sign the Petition to Help End Acid Attacks in India - M2woman
    September 2, 2015 @ 3:24 am

    […] video, Reshma raises awareness for the organisation Make Love Not Scars. It encourages us to sign a petition for the Indian government to ban over-the-counter sale of […]

  3. Acid Attack Survivor Teaches More Than Lipstick Tips
    September 2, 2015 @ 10:07 pm

    […] Learn more about the petition and how you can get involved here. […]

  4. Makeup Tutorial By Acid Attack Survivor Teaches More Than Lipstick Tips – Huffington Post | Great makeup online
    September 3, 2015 @ 6:20 am

    […] The group recently launched a petition that, as of Wednesday, collected more than 2,000 signatures.  […]

  5. Acid Attack Survivor Teaches How To Get Perfect Red Lips | Focus News
    September 3, 2015 @ 7:17 am

    […] At the end of the video, she appeals to sign a petition asking for a ban on the open sale of acid in the market. Sign the petition, here. […]

  6. Make Love Not Scars, une pétition qu'il faut signer
    September 7, 2015 @ 7:12 am

    […] Make Love Not Scars lance une pétition pour faire interdir la vente d’acide. Vous pouvez vous aussi exprimé votre colère et agir […]

  7. Girl Survived an Acid Attack, What happend next is very Inspiring - ScoopTip
    September 7, 2015 @ 7:56 am

    […] help women’s of India and to help putting a ban over Acid sale, Sign the petition here […]

  8. #EndAcidSale : stop au vitriolage des femmes indiennes -WNC
    September 7, 2015 @ 8:20 am

    […] fin de chaque tutoriel, Reshma appelle à signer une pétition en ligne — près de 90 000 signatures ont déjà été recueillies. L’objectif étant de réguler la […]

  9. Jordan Bone & Reshma Share Inspiring Beauty Videos | StyleBlazer
    September 8, 2015 @ 3:20 pm

    […] the importance of lip care, but encourages viewers to sign the “Make Love Not Scars” petition, which calls to ban over the counter concentrated sulfuric acid in […]

  10. This Woman Will Teach You How To Get Perfect Red Lips. And Something More | Food Innovation Magazine
    September 8, 2015 @ 8:55 pm

    […] The woman in it is Reshma, an acid attack survivor and throughout the video she guides us through the process of acquiring the perfect lips. However, at the end of the video, she says that it is not harder to buy concentrated acid than it is to buy red lipstick. And that is what this organisation is fighting against. You can help too by signing this petition. […]

  11. Tutorial de maquiagem faz alerta sobre violência contra mulher | iG Colunistas - Comunicação de Interesse Público
    September 8, 2015 @ 9:17 pm

    […] de seu website oficial, a campanha mostra perfis e imagens reais de vítimas de ataque ácido, que decidiram não se […]

  12. Acid Attack Survivor Reshma Redefines Beauty · WomenNow.in
    September 8, 2015 @ 11:38 pm

    […] complete ban of acid sale in India. Through Reshma’s videos, Make Love Not Scars is running an online petition for the same addressing to the Prime Minister. In a span of two weeks, the petition has earned a […]

  13. This Heart-Wrenching Red Lip Beauty DIY Will Make You Cry | Hair Style Collection
    September 9, 2015 @ 5:07 am

    […] Reshma is raising awareness for fellow victims and the organization Make Love Not Scars. This group has started a petition calling for the Indian government to ban the sale of acid (which some people use to clean their […]

  14. | ClioMakeUp Blog / Tutto su Trucco, Bellezza e Makeup ;) » L’incredibile coraggio di Reshma: i make-up tutorial e la petizione contro la vendita di acido
    September 9, 2015 @ 5:31 am

    […] è immediato e facilissimo: basta inserire il nome e la mail seguendo questo link: http://makelovenotscars.org/end-acid-sale/. Ad oggi le firme sono 156,872 e sembrano circa la metà dell’obiettivo prefissato dal […]

  15. She survived an acid attack. Now her makeup tutorials are turning heads and raising awareness. | Emergenturd
    September 9, 2015 @ 10:02 am

    […] campaign has earned global support, and the petition has received over 159,000 signatures to […]